Day in Tech History Podcast, Blog 365 Days a Year!

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December 21, 2000: Child Internet Protection Act into Law

2000 – President Bill Clinton signs the Child Internet Protection Act into law. The law is implemented to set rules for the web to expose them to pornography and sexual content. In 2003 the law will be challenged, but will be upheld. COPA required websites with “material harmful to minors”  to restrict their sites access with proof of age. “Material harmful to minors” was defined as material.  This included sexual acts or nudity. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 21 Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs becomes the first Full length Animated feature Quake II becomes Open Source Python 2.2...

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December 20, 1996: Apple Buys NeXT

1996 – Steve Jobs started Apple. When he left Apple, he started NeXT. When Apple started to fall, Steve Jobs came back. Of course, having 2 computer companies is not a good idea – So why not buy it out?That is what Apple did. In a $400 Million deal, they got a new OS and Steve Jobs. Of course, Jobs did not become CEO of Apple again – he reported to current CEO Dr. Gilbert F. Amelio. NeXTstep OS would ultimately become Mac OS X. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 19 IBM 7040 and 7044 released...

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December 19, 1974: Do it Yourself Altair Kit

1974 – Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (MITS) puts out the first ever “Do it yourself” Altair 8800. You would get it through Popular Mechanics Magazine, then assemble it yourself. This is a turning point in home computer setup. The price for an Altair 8800 kit – $397 – and it included Microsoft Altair BASIC. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 19 DirectX 9 is released RIAA switches from suing users to ISP Samuel Clemens patents suspenders

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December 17, 1989: First Simpsons Episode

1989 – The first full episode of the Simpsons airs on FOX TV network. 21 years and 1 movie later, the show still continues on strong. The cast stayed pretty much the same since 89. The Simpsons started on FOX as an animated short on the Tracy Ullman Show. It was on that show for 3 seasons when it was moved to their own prime time spot. The Simpsons is one of the longest running sitcoms and even has their own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 17 PureBasic v.2.0...

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December 16, 1994: Large Hadron Collider Approved

1994 – Although its only been in mainstream news for a couple years, the Large Hadron Collider has actually been around for many years now. On this day, for example, CERN receives not only approval, but also the funding to build this massive device. Because of this, CERN hands the WebCore project to the French organization INRIA (the Institut National pour la Recherche en Informatique et Automatique.) This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 16 Kevin Mitnick charged with stealing $1 million from DEC The Transistor is first demonstrated to a small audience The Pepper Pad is released...

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December 15, 1983: AltaVista Launches

1995 – At the turn of the Internet age, researchers at Digital Equipment Corporation, led by Paul Flaherty, Louis Monier and Michael Burrows, created a web crawler and indexer algorithm. The web program was launched on December 15th and called “AltaVista”. The name was chosen because of the surrounds of their company in Palo Alto, CA. The original name was altavista.digital.com and used a multi-threaded crawler (Scooter). The back-end was running on advanced hardware, therefore it could gather information faster than any other web crawling software out there. AltaVista was one of the top search engines out there until Google...

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December 14, 1994: W3C Held First Meeting

1994 – The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C) held its first meeting at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Albert Vezza and Tim Berners-Lee founded the group to development and maintain international standards for the World Wide Web. Since then, the W3C has overseen the validation efforts in HTML and other formats. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 14 Delta rolls out WiFi on flights Microsoft releases Windows NT 4.0 SP2 Edward R. Murrow features the Whirlwind computer on See It Now

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