Day in Tech History - Daily Tech History Podcast & Blog 365 Days a Year

Walt Disney Company 0

October 16, 1923: Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio

1923- 90 years ago, Walt and Roy Disney start what is known as the Walt Disney Company. It started as the Disney Brothers Cartoon studio. Walt Disney created a short film entitled Alice’s Wonderland. In 1986, the name was officially changed to the Walt Disney Company. Steve Jobs was a shareholder and board member. Walt Disney Studios is one of the largest in Hollywood with networks ESPN, ABC, A&E and more. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 16 FORTRAN is released Wal-Mart Sues Amazon iTunes for Windows President Bill Clinton signs the web copyright law Podcast: Play in...

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token-ring-configuration 0

October 15, 1985: IBM Announces Token Ring Network

1985- IBM announced, with co-developer Texas Instruments, the Token Ring network along with PC Network software – six months ahead of schedule. The TR only did network transmission speed of 4 Mbps (It didn’t hit speeds of 16 Mbps until 1989), and worked over standard phone wiring. Using terminated BNC cable, Token Ring created just that; a Ring connection that talks in one direction. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 15 Mac Plus Retires, Mac Classic Launches John Sculley resigns from Apple AOL Lays off 20% Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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zmodem 0

October 14,1986: Open Source ZModem Released

1986 – Telenet funded a project to develop an improved public domain application to application file transfer protocol. This protocol would alleviate the throughput problems their network customers were experiencing with XMODEM and Kermit file transfers. ZMODEM could provide high performance and reliability over packet switched networks while preserving XMODEM’s simplicity. It made XModem and YModem obsolete. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 14 Chuck Yeager flies the speed of sound ARM 250 is released Apple launched the iPhone 4S Google announced Buzz was shutting down. Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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Priceline 0

October 13, 1999: Priceline Lawsuit on Microsoft, Expedia

1999- Priceline filed a lawsuit against Microsoft and its Expedia travel service. The suit outlined how they violated U.S. patent number 5,794,207, “Method and Apparatus for a Cryptographically Assisted Network System Designed to Facilitate Buyer-Driven Conditional Purchase Offers.” The two sites come to terms in 2001, in where Microsoft pays a fine. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 13 Microsoft tries to acquire Intuit ATI & NVidia antitrust is closed NBCOlympics.com stats Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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NeXT Computer - Steve Jobs 0

October 12, 1988: Steve Jobs Introduces NeXT Computer

1988- Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco, California. Steve Jobs shows off the NeXT Computer featuring the Motorola 68030 microprocessor at 25 MHz. The computer introduces several new features including optical storage disk, voice recognition, and object-oriented languages. The system came with the NeXT STep operating system and cost $6,500. NeXT computer sold around 50,000 units. The NeXTSTEP Operating System was highly influential. It was the basis of Mac OS X. Apple acquired NeXT on Decemeber 20th, 1996 for $429 million in cash. Steve Jobs became intrim CEO of Apple and the rest was history. Steve Jobs almost didn’t come...

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Visicalc - Dan Bricklin 0

October 11, 1979: Visicalc – First Killer PC App Released

1979- Visicalc is released by Dan Bricklin. The spreadsheet application is called the first killer app for personal computers. It turned the PC from a hobby to a business tool. Only downfall for Bricklin was he did not patent the system, therefore, clones like SuperCalc, Microsoft’s MultiPlan and Lotus 1-2-3, would show up. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 11 IBM 1311 Storage Drive Office 2001 for Mac Poloroid files Chapter 11 Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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Pac Man Released in US 0

October 10, 1980: Pac Man North American Release

1980- The video game that changed it all debut in North America. The infamous yellow pie chart gobbling up little dots and avoiding ghosts for top scores was released to the Japanese arcades in May, but finally made it to North America in 1980. The 80’s era officially was in full swing. Pac Man fever was on the loose. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 10 XP SP1 and SP1a support ends The Metric system is born Happy Tom Cruise Day. Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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Hayes Microcomputer Files bankruptcy 0

October 9, 1998: Hayes Microcomputer Filed Chapter 11

1998 – We all remember the modem, right? Dial into the internet through an ISP? Some of you may still have that technology, but if you have dealt with modems for a while, you remember Hayes. The Hayes corporation was pretty big back in the day – giving your Apple II connectivity to the world. Well, that is until 1998 when it’s course ran out. Stocks went from $12 a share, down to almost nothing. Hayes had no choice but to file for bankruptcy. Zoom Technologies (now called (Zoom Telephonics) bought the company out in 1999. This Day in Tech...

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