Day in Tech History - Daily Tech History Podcast & Blog 365 Days a Year

Gottlieb Daimler Car 0

July 23, 1886: First Car Ever,1903: First Model A Seventeen Years Later

Back in 1886, Gottlieb Daimler gets into his new invention. It looks like a horse-drawn buggy, but it has a one cylinder 1.1 HP engine mounted in the back seat. The first car got up to 16 km/h Seventeen years later, in 1903, Ford Motor company sells it’s first car. A Model A to Dr. Ernst Pfenning of Chicago. It was a twin cylindar combustion engine. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 23 IBM goes Open-Source Palm launches the Tungston T2 Commodore unveils the Amiga 1000 Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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Hacker Troll 0

July 22, 1988: Arrests of Atlanta Three, Legion of Doom, Fry Guy

The Secret Service made some major breakthroughs in Hacking circles in 1989 as three members of the Legion of Doom were arrested. They were charged with hacking into Bell South’s Telephone Networks in 1988. Franklin Darden, Adam grant and Robert Riggs would be sentenced to time in Federal prison. The Secret Service also find out who “Fry Guy” is – the employee who hacked McDonalds mainframe for raises. It was part of the “Hacker Crackdown”. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 22 Mac OS 8.0 is released Bill Gates and Paul Allen sign the MITS agreement Amazon...

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John Scopes 0

July 21, 1925: John Scopes Found Guilty on Teaching Evolution

John Scopes was an activist and a teacher. In what was called the “Scopes Monkey Trial“, John was charged on May 5th, 1925 of teaching evolution in his Tennessee classroom. On July 21 he was found guilty and fined $100. The central argument in the case was the Butler Act, prohibiting that human evolution, or any Biblical account of origin could be taught.Scopes verdict was overturned, but only because of a technicality. The Judge fined Scopes and not a jury. The Butler Act was repealed in 1967. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 21 Xerox leaves the computer market...

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Y2K 0

July 20, 2012: Dark Knight Rises,1999: Y2K Act Gives Government Protection

2012 – At the premier of the Dark Knight Rises in Aurora, CO. James Eagan Holmes opened fire in one of the theaters. Holmes killed 20 people and injured many. He is currently being evaluated for insanity with a court date of Feb 13, 2014. In a step to protect companies from any post Y2K problems, in 1999, President Bill Clinton signs a bill into law protecting companies from legal action. Today I have signed into law H.R. 775, the “Y2K Act.” This is extraordinary, time-limited legislation designed to deal with an exceptional and unique circumstance of national significance—the Y2K...

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Apple 0

July 19, 2000: Apple PowerMac G4 Cube

Apple released a series of new items in 2000, including a new “button less” mouse, iMovie2 and the iMac DV series with the PowerPC G3 processor. But they also introduced the PowerMac G4 Cube – a 450 or 500 MHz computer with Velocity Engine – A Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) which operates concurrently with existing integer and floating-point. Add with it 2 Firewire ports, 10/100BaseT Ethernet, Modem and 20 GB hard drive and you had a serious system at the time. The cube could not take cards because of it’s case sizes and the DVD drive was located on the top...

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Arco-Idaho[1] 0

July 17, 1955: First Town Entirely Run on Nuclear Power

During a one-hour test in 1955, Arco, Idaho became the first town to be fully electrically run on nuclear power. The small community was powered by the National Reactor Testing Station” (NRTS). NTRS later became the Idaho National Laboratory. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 17 Apple redesigns the iMac, 20 GB iPod Accenture purchases Symbian Professional Services Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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Amazon.com 0

July 16, 1995: Amazon Goes Online, Happy Birthday Orville Redenbacker

Fluid Concepts & Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought. That was the first book Amazon sold on July 16th, 1995. The company ran from their garage in Bellevue, Washington. 3 SPARC machines was all they had and a cool little mechanism that rung a bell every time a book was sold. The business model was set to make profit in 5 years. It was a good thing, because that may have helped it survive the dot com bubble. 17 years later, Amazon is going strong. Purchases of companies like WOOT! and Zappos!, along with the introduction...

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