Tagged: aggregator

Jack Tramiel 0

July 6, 1984: Jack Tramiel Fired Atari Staff

In a very bold move, Jack Tramiel laid off the majority of his staff outside of engineering. This comes in 1984, 3 days after Tramiel buys Atari for $240 million in 10 and 12 year notes. The employees note that it wasn’t a Hard layoff. One employee stated that no one cared if they looted the building, so they did. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for July 6 ABC joins Hulu Microsoft’s first corporate president Source code of e-mule was released

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Hotmail 0

July 4, 1996: Microsoft Hotmail Independence Day Launch

“Happy Independence Day. In return, we are going to give you a great new way to get email. It’s called “Hotmail“. Be free from your internet service provider!” That was the call to action on 1996. Hotmail launched their email service as “HoTMaiL” (HTML is upper-case). It is the first web-based email that was later named MSN Hotmail, then Windows Live Hotmail. Hotmail had many features since it’s start. Unlimited storage was one big feature. In 1997, Microsoft purchased Hotmail for $400 million, and changed the name to MSN Hotmail. They paired with the Microsoft Instant Messanger, then built items...

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IBM Apple 0

July 3, 1991: Apple, IBM Create Pact on Power PC Mac

1991 – IBM’s Jim Cannavino met with John Sculley of Apple. They worked out a deal and signed a sharing agreement. It would allow Mac to integrate with IBM enterprise systems. It would also allow Apple to use the PowerPC with their RISC based Mac to work together.Power PC stands for Performance Optimization with Enhanced RISC. It is also known as PPC. The RISC architecture processor was first meant for personal computers, yet embedded machines adopted them for use. Computers such as the AmigaOS 4, POSIX, BeOS all used PowerPC. Even Windows machines used PowerPC for their NT 3.51 and...

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Napster 0

July 2, 2001: Napster Shut Down

Napster, the file sharing service (started by John & Shawn Fanning, and Sean Parker) that was up since 1999, had a series of trials and tribulations until 2001. After lengthy legal battles with artists like Madonna and Metallica, Napster began to realize their business model is not going to work. They shut down the entire network to comply with an injunction. This case was partially settled on September 24, 2001, where Napster was ordered to pay $26 million in damages and $10 million in future royalties.Eventually, Napster filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, right before Napster 3.0 was ready to be deployed. On...

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Dr. Alan Chow 0

June 30, 2000: Silicon Microchips beneath Human Retinas

2000 – Dr. Alan chow and brother Vincent announced they successfully placed a silicon microchip beneath human retinas. The chip is smaller than the head on a pin and only microns thin. These chips also contain solar cells to help power the chip. In what is called “Optobionics”, the ASR chip is inserted behind the retina in the “subretinal space”. This is a 2 hour procedure and the chip can last up to 8 years after (depending on care). Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 30 IBM unbundles software from Hardware President Bill Clinton e-signs the first bill...

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ASCI White 0

June 29, 2000: The ASCI White

2000 – IBM unveiled the ASCI White – their fastest computer yet. This supercomputer was based on IBM’s commercial RS/6000 SP computer. 512 computers were connected to make this supercomputer. over 8 million processors, 5 Terabytes of memory and 160 TB of disk storage. The computer was completed on this day in New York, and would go on-line on August 15, 2001 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 29 Compuserve acquires TheSource, a major competitor Gigabit Ethernet standard is set Max Butler pleads guilty to stealing 2 million credit cards

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Aereo 0

June 28, 2014: Aereo Shuts Down

2014 – Trying to be the first provider of over-the-air channels, Aereo was told to shut down completely after a supreme court decision went against the company. The idea was simple – take the over-the-air network channels and offer them on the Internet. Based in New York, the company opened services in 24 different cities. You could only watch the programming of your area on your PC, Mac or Linux. There were around 28 channels you could choose from and pricing was simply $1 a day. Aereo was faced with many legal issues, including the Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition...

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