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December 16, 1994: Large Hadron Collider Funding Approved

Large Hadron Collider Magnets by Alpinethread

Large Hadron Collider Magnets by Alpinethread

1994 – Although its only been in mainstream news for a couple years, the Large Hadron Collider has actually been around for many years now. On this day, for example, CERN receives not only approval, but also the funding to build this massive device. Because of this, CERN hands the WebCore project to the French organization INRIA (the Institut National pour la Recherche en Informatique et Automatique.)

This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 16

  • Kevin Mitnick charged with stealing $1 million from DEC
  • The Transistor is first demonstrated to a small audience
  • The Pepper Pad is released
  • Steve Jobs and Apple back out of MacWorld
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September 29, 2001: Mac OSX “Puma” Released

Apple

Apple

2001- With one version of the Apple OS X under it’s belt, “Puma” – or OS X 10.1 is released to the public. Updates would include extended DVD support and the ability to burn DVD – RW. There were still a lot of people against this new version of software. A lot of Mac users still liked OS 9 and thought OS X is a “superfluous” upgrade.

This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for September 29

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  • CERN is formed
  • Lenovo recalls 526,000 batteries
  • Zimbra Password exposure.
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May 17: HTML, HTTP Set Up on NeXTcube

Tim Berners-Lee

May 17, 1991: Tim Berners-Lee sets up HTML

1991- Tim Berners-Lee sets up HyperText Markup language (HTML) and Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) at CERN. He put the protocol on a NeXTStep machine. The server was then launched onto the word wide web, effectively making this the first day you could get a website that could support more than text.

That is when CERN and Berners-Lee release the World Wide Web standard. However, there was a long way to go. It wasn’t until August 6th, that Berners-Lee put up the first webpage.

Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 17
[dithstand]

  • Ars Technica sold to Conde Nast
  • Lawrence Welk passes away
  • Intel Introduced the Pentium III 55o
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April 30: World Wide Web Goes to Public Domain

Tim Berners-Lee

April 30, 1993: World Wide Web enters in Public Domain

1993 - You may see www, but it’s true meaning is World Wide Web. Tim Berners-Lee wrote WorldWideWeb during the 1990, while working for CERN. He did it on a NeXT Computer and developed it for the NeXTSTep platform (which Apple bought and turned into Mac OS X). But it was today that was most momentous, as the World Wide Web entered in the public domain. That meant anyone could access without license fees. Now a person could apply style sheets or post media on the web. The initial web browser was also the web editor.

Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 30

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Other Events in the Day in Technology History

  • Ubuntu 4.10 “Warty Warthog” is released
  • Microsoft announces ten million copies of Windows 3.0
  • ABC joins Hulu
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