Tagged: Geek

Pioneer 10 0

March 3, 1972: Pioneer 10 Launched

 

 1972 – NASA launched the Pioneer 10 (a.k.a. Pioneer F) from Cape Canaveral, FL. This was the first spacecraft to traverse an astroid belt. The craft collected the environmental information around Jupiter. This included solar wind, cosmic rays and other events. Pioneer 10 successfully reached Jupiter in November 1973. It took 60 days to collect multiple pieces of information as the craft was in range of the planet. It continued on an unknown journey – passing Saturn in 1976, Uranus in 1979 and Neptune in 1983. The craft continued to send data even after the mission had officially ended in 1997. In...

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The Legend of Zelda 0

February 21, 1986: The Legend of Zelda

 

 1986 – The 3rd person action adventure game The Legend of Zelda was released by Nintendo for the Famicon in Japan. There, it was known as “The Hyrule Fantasy: The Legend of Zelda”. Hyrule was the fantasy land the game took place in. In the game, Link was given tasks in ultimate goal to rescue Princess Zelda from Ganon. The game took up the full 128 KB ROM. Passwords had to be written to Famicon’s disk drive. Something that the NES did not have. The game wasn’t released to the US until August 22, 1987. Nintendo had doubts this game would be well...

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US4074351-2[1] 0

February 14, 1978: First Micro on a Chip as Speak and Spell was Born

 

 Happy Valentines Day! 1978 – Texas Instruments patented the first “Micro on a Chip” (part of US 4074351). Gary Boone and Michael Cochran of Texas Instruments designed the chip (1971) and then led the group to the patent – spanning from 1974 to 1978. This chip was used in multiple inventions such as garage door openers, burglar alarms and many electronic toys. The chip eventually was the foundation for speech synthesis, which would eventually be used in the Texas Instruments Speak & Spell. Of course, the single chip process also gave advancement to the AI movement. Of course this would not come without controversy...

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FTP 0

February 7, 1973: File Transfer Protocol (FTP) Introduced as Standard

 

 1973 – FTP was written by Abhay Bhushan in 1971. It was published as RFC 114. FTP allows a TCP control connection to the FTP server port 21 to pass data. The FTP protocol was made a standard as stated in RFC959 Declarative. The declaration outlined the ports used, commands FTP accepted, values for transfer parameters and the modes allowed. FTP servers have been a crucial part in the connection between computers. FTP connections via the Internet allow webmasters and app developers to upload, edit and remove files on remote servers. Later, a more secure FTP protocol was added to prevent...

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Alan Shepard 0

February 6, 1971: Alan Shepard Golfs on Moon

 

 1971 – Moving to the Space side of Geek, Apollo 14 astronaut Alan Shepard hits the first golf ball on the Moon. He used a six-iron attached to a sample collection tool. He hit 2 balls, in which the second would have made Happy Gillmore look bad. Of course, the moon has 1/6 the gravity as the Earth does. Alan B. Shepard Jr. was also the second person to travel in space and the fifth person to walk on the moon. His Apollo 14 piloting of the lander was deemed the most accurate. Shepard died in 1998. Wikazine – Full...

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Western Union 0

January 27, 2006: Western Union discontinued Telegram and Commercial Messanging services

 

 2006- Founded in 1851, Western Union was responsible for getting the important messages from point A to B. Whether through telegram or commercial messaging, Western Union was synonymous with the service. But on January 27, 2006, that all ended. As Western Union wrote: “Effective 2006-01-27, Western Union will discontinue all Telegram and Commercial Messaging services. We regret any inconvenience this may cause you, and we thank you for your loyal patronage. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact a customer service representative.”   Wikazine – Full show notes for January 27 MIT vs. David LaMaccia Kevin Mitnik cracks the...

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X-Ray 0

January 23, 1896: The First Public X-Rays

 

 1896 – Although he was not the only person to be working on the technology and not the first X-ray, Wilhelm Roentgen gave the first public lecture and demonstration of his device. He photographed Dr. Albert von Kolliker’s hand at the Wurzburg Physical Medical Society. The first X-ray he ever took was of his wife’s hand (with wedding ring on). The practice is also known as Röntgen rays. Wikazine – Full show notes for January 23 Sega and Bandai announce a merger Apple releases Macintosh Office The integrated circuit is conceived Lenovo acquired IBM ‘s Server division Podcast: Play in new window | Download...

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Switchback Railway 0

January 20, 1885: the Gravity Pleasure Switchback Railway Patent

 

 1885 – Sounding like anything but a roller coaster, the Gravity Pleasure Switchback Railway was the first American designed amusement coaster designed by LaMarcus Adna Thompson. Only 5 cents to ride, the Switchback was a simple coaster that took you about 600 feet to the next tower at six miles per hour. It had a height of 50 feet and a drop of 43 feet. It opened on June 16, 1884 and eventually was replaced. But on this day, the roller coaster saw one of its first patents from this ride. Learn more about Patents: Ingenious Inventions, How they work and How they...

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