Tagged: IBM

OS X Server 0

May 21, 2001: Mac OS X Server

2001 – Apple released the Mac OS X Server, based on Rhapsody, which was a hybrid of NeXT OPENSTEP. The server ran file services, Macintosh Manager, Quicktime Streaming Server, WebObjects, NetBoot and more. Each new version of OS X Server then coincided with the desktop release name – Jaguar, Panther, Leopard, etc. “Built on Mac OS X’s incredibly stable and robust foundation, Mac OS X Server has the power of UNIX, yet is simple and easy to install, administer and maintain,” said Philip Schiller, Apple’s vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing. “Mac OS X Server is Apple’s most powerful server ever...

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Star Wars I: the Phantom Menace 0

May 19, 1999: Star Wars Episode I

1999 – Sixteen years after “Return of the Jedi”, George Lucas finally moves his vision forward with “Star Wars: Episode I – the Phantom Menace”. The story of young Anakin Skywalker and how Obi-Wan Kenobi brought him in, trained him, and ultimately lost him to the dark side. Episode I grossed over $924.3 million worldwide and became one of the highest-grossing films of 1999. The 2nd set trilogy would continue with Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith. The movie was received with warm reviews. The general consensus was the character development lacked while the scenes, characters, and landscapes were breathtaking....

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Playstation 3 0

May 14, 2011: Sony Playstation Network Goes Back Online

2011 – Hackers took down the Sony Playstation network on April 20th, 2011. Around 77 million accounts were comprimised and gamers couldn’t play online for over a month. On May 14, Sony started bringing the services back online on a country-by-country basis. North America was the first, and people could sign-in, play PS3 and PSP games, access rented content, play music already purchased, and use approved 3rd party apps such as Hulu and Netflix. A firmware update 3.61 was also available to update security for the users. When it was all said and done, Sony had lost $171 million on this...

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Turbo-C 0

May 13, 1987: Turbo C Released

1987 – Version 1.0 of the Turbo C programming language is released. It offers the first integrated edit-compile-run development environment for the C programming language for IBM-compatible personal computers. Turbo C was developed by Bob Jervis as “Wizard C”. It runs on just 384KB of memory and is capable of inline assembly with full access to C symbolic names and structures. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 12 Digital Equipment, Intel, and Xerox jointly announce the Ethernet network specification. HP Acquires EDS Iranian police close down more than four hundred Internet Cafes

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Dvorak Keyboard 2

May 12, 1936: The Dvorak Keyboard Patented

1936 – When typewriters first came out, many different people worked on keyboard layouts to become the standard. QWERTY was a popular system but was not efficient. August Dvorak and William Dealey decided to create and patent an alternative to this style, the end result – the Dvorak keyboard was born. The keyboard was more efficient, too. Key letters were together so you would “roll” words. T was next to H, N was next to S. The sub-dominant hand would take care of vowels and lesser-used consonants, while the dominant hand took care of most of the consonants. Therefore, a left-hand and...

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Kemeny Kurtz BASIC 0

May 1, 1964: First BASIC Program Written

1964– John Kemeny and Thomas Kurtz run the first BASIC program at 4 AM in Dartmouth. The duo used a General Electric 225 mainframe computer and ran a simple compiler program. The duo created different programming languages since 1956, including Darsimco (Dartmouth Simplified Code), Dope (Dartmouth Oversimplified Programming Experiment). It wasn’t until BASIC (Begginer’s All-Purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) that became a success. The first code ran at 4 A.M on May 1st. BASIC was easy to learn, could go past mainframes (as Bill Gates and Paul Allen adapted it for personal computers in 1975), and also allowed for batch processing....

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TRS 80 Model 4 0

April 26, 1983: TRS-80 Model 4

1983– The Trash-80, as it was so admirably called in the day, a.k.a. the TRS-80 Model 4 is introduced. It contains a 4 MHz processor, 16 KB of RAM, a cassette interface, Keyboard and Monochrome monitor. $1000 for the base model, or $2000 if you upgraded the RAM to 64 KB and 5.25 disk drives. The first TRS-80 was released in 1977. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 26 IBM 7030 – the Stretch Supercomputer Last release of the Nemesis AOL purchases Flea-Flicker

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Apple IIc 0

April 24, 1984: Apple IIc Introduced

1984 – Apple introduces the Apple IIc, their answer to a portable machine. It weighed 7 1/2 lbs and featured a 1.023MHz CPU and 128 KB RAM. $1,295. The device device had a built-in floppy and peripheral expansion ports. This was a closed system – no expansion slots to plug in cards. It was deemed an appliance computer, which meant was ready to go when you pulled it out of the box. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 24 Other Events in the Day in Technology History IBM PC first announced (but wouldn’t be released until Aug...

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