Tagged: intel

Aereo 0

June 28, 2014: Aereo Shuts Down

2014 – Trying to be the first provider of over-the-air channels, Aereo was told to shut down completely after a supreme court decision went against the company. The idea was simple – take the over-the-air network channels and offer them on the Internet. Based in New York, the company opened services in 24 different cities. You could only watch the programming of your area on your PC, Mac or Linux. There were around 28 channels you could choose from and pricing was simply $1 a day. Aereo was faced with many legal issues, including the Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition...

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Compaq Deskpro 4000N - the first NetPC 0

June 16, 1997: NetPC Announced

1997 – Several computer companies banded together to help create the NetPC. A disk-less computer that got all information, including install – from a corporate server or the Internet. Basically, these would be similar to thin clients or “Dumb terminals” for work computers. No CD drive, no floppy disc and limited disk space. Cases were sealed so nobody could get inside to reconfigure the computer. Installs would be handled via the Internet, therefore, no personal software could be installed. Microsoft and Intel unveiled the system at the PC Expo trade show. NetPC would work with Compaq, Dell, IBM, HP, Acer, Gateway 2000, Mitac,...

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United Online 0

June 8, 2001: NetZero and Juno Merge to United Online

2001 – To compete with AOL, Internet Service Providers NetZero and Juno Online Services announce they will merge to become United Online. The company would eventually acquire other assets to keep afloat, including the purchase of the FTD group in 2008. Of course, NetZero had changed their business model to a Wireless plan in 2012 and operates a broadband and dial up service nation-wide. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 8 Intel introduces the 8086 processor Yahoo acquires Viaweb Apple introduces the iPhone 3GS

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Intel 8088 0

June 1, 1979: the 8088 Microprocessor

1979 – Intel released the successor to the 8086 processor in the Intel 8088 chip. With a clock rate of either 4.77 MHz or 8 MHz, this 16-bit chip had an external bus of 8 bits and 29,000 transistors. It was used in IBM PC and PC-XT computers during the 80’s. Descendants to the 8088 are the 80188, 80186, and what would become the 386, 486 and Pentium chips. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 1 Steve Jobs becomes the major apple shareholder with 1.5 million MN city makes Google remove Street view pictures The first batch of Scotch...

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Tumblr 0

May 20, 2013: Yahoo Acquired Tumblr

2013 – In a $1.1 billion deal, Yahoo acquired the blogging site Tumblr. This caused many concerns for those using the service – especially those who curate blogs with pornographic content. However, Yahoo insisted they will be running Tumblr as a separate company and will not interrupt any account unless it breaks laws (such as child pornography). Yahoo did de-list a lot of those blogs in their search a couple months later to give others a clean-search experience. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 20 AppleLink is created Microsoft and Intuit discontinue their merger due to Antitrust issues...

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Star Wars I: the Phantom Menace 0

May 19, 1999: Star Wars Episode I

1999 – Sixteen years after “Return of the Jedi”, George Lucas finally moves his vision forward with “Star Wars: Episode I – the Phantom Menace”. The story of young Anakin Skywalker and how Obi-Wan Kenobi brought him in, trained him, and ultimately lost him to the dark side. Episode I grossed over $924.3 million worldwide and became one of the highest-grossing films of 1999. The 2nd set trilogy would continue with Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith. The movie was received with warm reviews. The general consensus was the character development lacked while the scenes, characters, and landscapes were breathtaking....

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Turbo-C 0

May 13, 1987: Turbo C Released

1987 – Version 1.0 of the Turbo C programming language is released. It offers the first integrated edit-compile-run development environment for the C programming language for IBM-compatible personal computers. Turbo C was developed by Bob Jervis as “Wizard C”. It runs on just 384KB of memory and is capable of inline assembly with full access to C symbolic names and structures. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 12 Digital Equipment, Intel, and Xerox jointly announce the Ethernet network specification. HP Acquires EDS Iranian police close down more than four hundred Internet Cafes

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