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April 13, 1965: Moore’s Law First Coined

Moores Law

Moores Law

1965- You may have heard about Moore’s Law. This states that every 18 months, a processor will double in speed. The law’s name is coined after Intel co-founder Gordon E. Moore. He said:

It can’t continue forever. The nature of the exponential is that you push them out and eventually disaster happens.

The law started with the Integrated circuit. It has continued to this day – especially since we switched ideas and, instead of speeding up, we double the amount of processors.

Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 13

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  • Apple discontinues the Power Mac G4
  • Atari signs agreement with Williams Electronics
  • Metallica sues Napster
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April 10, 2003: First Blu-Ray Player, 1989: Intel 486 Introduced

Sony Blu Ray Player

April 10, 2003: The first Sony Blu Ray Player hit store shelves

2003 – Sony Blu-Ray players hit store shelves for the first time. The BDZ-S77 was the first model, but didn’t sell too well because of the $3800 price tag attached to it. Add to it no movies available in the Blu-Ray format just yet. In fact, the first Blu-Ray movies didn’t hit shelves until June 20, 2006. 50 First Dates, the Fifth Element, Hitch, Terminator and Charlies Angels: Full Throttle were the first titles to be released.

1989- At Spring Comdex, Intel introduced the 25 MHz 80486 microprocessor. The processor would integrate the math co-processor into one chip (the 386′s compendium included the 387 math co-processor). Price $900

Wikazine – Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 10

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  • National DNA Database is launched in the UK
  • Fox Trot debuts
  • Niklas Zennstrom and Janus Friis anounce they would like to buy Skype back from eBay.
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April 7, 2008: ATOM Processor Launched

Intel ATOM Processor

April 7, 2008: Intel ATOM Processor Launches

2008- Intel launches their newest processor: the ATOM processor. It’s codename was Silverthorne. It is a ATOM Z single processor using the 45 nm die processes (the processor was smaller than a penny). The ATOM processor would run at 800 MHZ with a 512 L2 cache and 533 Front side bus. The most current ATOM processor is the S1220, S1240 and S1260 for servers (released December 2012). ATOM processors can run 32 bit and 64 bit hardware and software.

Wikazine – Full show notes for April 7

[dithy]

  • Sun lays off Scalable System Group Workforce
  • AOL VoIP launches
  • Publication of the RFC 1
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March 30, 1951: UNIVAC I – First American Commercial Computer

Univac

March 30, 1951: Univac is Unveiled

1951John William Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert unveil the first commercial computer, the UNIVersal Automatic Computer (UNIVAC I). The computer was manufactured under the company name of Sperry Rand Corporation for the United States Census Bureau. The UNIVAC will remain in operation through 1963.Univac I was not only the first American commercial computer, but also the first computer designed to computer large numbers. The first contracts for these computers were government agencies, like the Census Bureau and US Air Force. It took almost a year to finally ship the first Univac computer.

Wikazine – Full show notes of Technology History for March 30

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  • Quantum sells to Maxtor
  • Intel launches Nehalem
  • Microsoft ends Encarta
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March 22, 1993: First Pentium Processor Shipped

Intel Pentium Processor

March 22, 1993: Intel Pentium Processor ships

1993 - The first Pentium processors get shipped out. The 80586, invented y Vinod Dahm, ran at 60 and 66 MHz clock speeds. 3.1 million transistors and 4 GB of addressable memory. It was fabricated in a 0.8 µm BiCMOS process. It was replaced by the P54C.

Wikazine – Full show notes for March 22

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  • The Vinyl version of the DVD – the CED – was patented
  • The first laser was patented to Bell Telephone Labratories
  • BLEEM! begins accepting pre-orders
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March 8, 1983: IBM Announced IBM PC XT

IBM

March 8, 1983: IBM PC XT

1983 -IBM announces the IBM Personal Computer XT (eXtended Technology). It features a Intel 8088 processor,  10MB hard drive, 128 kB RAM, 40Kb ROM and double-sided 360 kB floppy drive. For $4995, it’s all yours. The machine was also called IBM Machine Type number 5160.The XT could support up to 256 kb on the motherboard. You could get expansion cards to raise to 640 kb. The 8088 processor ran at 4.77 MHz. It weighed 32 lbs (desktop only) and was 19.5 inches wide by 16 inches deep and 5.5 inches high.

The IBM PC XT was the successor to the IBM PC. It was developed until April 1987.

Wikazine – Full show notes for March 8

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  • Sierra and Broderbund announce the merge to Sierra-Broderbund
  • The first GHz processors begin to ship
  • Sun sues Microsoft
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February 26, 1991: Introduction of first Web Broswer – WorldWideWeb

WorldWideWeb

February 26, 1991: Sir Tim Berners Lee Shows the WorldWideWeb via Browser

1991Sir Tim Berners-Lee showed everyone the first web browser and WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) HTML editor. The Browsers’ name was called “WorldWideWeb”, but was later changed to “Nexus”. Berners-Lee ran it on the NeXTSTEP platform and worked with not only the File Transfer Protocol (FTP), but the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). Nexus is not in production anymore.

Wikazine – Full show notes for February 26

  • 3Com announces they will acquire US Robotics
  • Intel introduces the Pentium III
  • Yahoo launches Buzz
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February 22, 1999: AMD K6-III Sharptooth Processor

AMD

February 22, 1999 – AMD released K6-III

1999 - AMD releases the AMD K6-III Processor in speeds of 400 and 450 MHz. It would feature a 64KB Level 1 cache and a 256KB Level 2 cache. The 3DNow! graphics instructions would be supported, along with Direct X 6.0. There were 21.3 million transistors on the 0.25 micron process wafer.

Wikazine – Full show notes for February 22

  • Palm introduces the Palm IIIc and Palm IIIxe
  • Popcorn is introduced to the Pilgrims by Quadequina
  • Gawker puts Defamer up for sale
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