Tagged: Linux

Pittsburgh Supercomputer 0

June 9, 1986: Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center Opens

1986 – The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center opens. It links 5 supercomputer centers together – Princeton, San Diego, Illinois, and Cornell University. PSC is a leading partner in the TeraGrid, the National Science Foundation’s cyberinfrastructure program. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 9 Linux Kernel 2.0 is released iPhone 2.0 launches MessageMedia and Revnet join to become North America’s largest e-mail marketer

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CD-V format 0

May 30, 1987: Compact Disc Video (CD-V) Format

1987 – North American Phillips Company introduced the compact disc video format. Using the same technology as LaserVision, the “CD’s with Pictures” would be gold in color and the same size as an audio CD. They could hold up to 800 MB – which would allow for a full length movie in SD, or a video music album. The CD-V didn’t last that long, dissolving by 1991. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 30 TurboLinux OS 7 released Windows NT 3.51 released (adding Power PC support) The Pennsylvania Evening Post was the first paper in the US

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OS X Server 0

May 21, 2001: Mac OS X Server

2001 – Apple released the Mac OS X Server, based on Rhapsody, which was a hybrid of NeXT OPENSTEP. The server ran file services, Macintosh Manager, Quicktime Streaming Server, WebObjects, NetBoot and more. Each new version of OS X Server then coincided with the desktop release name – Jaguar, Panther, Leopard, etc. “Built on Mac OS X’s incredibly stable and robust foundation, Mac OS X Server has the power of UNIX, yet is simple and easy to install, administer and maintain,” said Philip Schiller, Apple’s vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing. “Mac OS X Server is Apple’s most powerful server ever...

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Damn Small Linux 0

April 15, 2005:Damn Small Linux Released

2005 – It was the release of the Damn Small Linux program, a Linux distribution that was designed to take up as little drive space as possible. John Andrews – DSL’s developer – Never allowed the ISO to go past 50 MB in size. You would be able to put DSL onto a CD or USB drive if needed. You can get the DSL ISO to install here Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 15 Pentium II processors introduced The paper disc format is announced The first McDonalds Hamburger is sold Search Engine “Cuil” launches in alpha.

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JOSS 0

February 11, 1966: JOSS Taken Down

1966 – The JOHNNIAC Open Shop System (JOSS) was taken down by the RAND Corporation. JOSS was set up to relive bottlenecks in programming batches and was based on the von Neumann architecture. This machine was noted for being used continuously from 1953 to 1966. Eventually, newer ideas pretty much took JOSS to the limit and the computer would start to be a big bottleneck. Eventually, JOSS was taken offline indefinitely. JOHNNIAC stands for the John Neumann Numerical Integrator and Automatic Computer. Wikazine – Full show notes for February 11 Digital Computers discontinues the Rainbow CRUX Linux 0.5.3 Released Starbucks announces they...

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DITH480 0

February 10: Niagra Falls Hydroelectric Project Begins

Sometimes I find incorrect information. On this day I wrote about a release which didn’t happen until the 26th. Therefore, I have redacted the post information and put this Editor’s note up. If you find other errors on the site, please let me know. Thanks! Wikazine – Full show notes for February 10 Steve Jobs lays off 280 NeXT employees and sells hardware to Canon Microsoft’s 10,000 patent 400 GB DDoS attack Thomas Watson Sr. orders the Selective Sequence Controlled Calculator (SSEC) to be built Niagara Falls Hydroelectric project begins production

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Alexander Graham Bell 0

January 25, 1881: The Oriental Telephone Company

1881 –  Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Edison establish the Oriental Telephone Company of New York and the Angle-Indian Telephone Company Ltd. These companies were licensed to sell telephones in other countries such as Greese, Turkey, India, Japan, China and more. Countries recieving phones would have 3-digit numbers, which changed to 4, 5, then finally 7. It is unclear when the Oriental Bell Telephone company dissolved, but some of the phone lines they installed are still functional to this day, as according to this article by Indiatimes.com 1915 – 34 years after the company established, the first transcontinental call would be made....

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