Tagged: Microsoft

Hotmail 0

July 4, 1996: Microsoft Hotmail Independence Day Launch

“Happy Independence Day. In return, we are going to give you a great new way to get email. It’s called “Hotmail“. Be free from your internet service provider!” That was the call to action on 1996. Hotmail launched their email service as “HoTMaiL” (HTML is upper-case). It is the first web-based email that was later named MSN Hotmail, then Windows Live Hotmail. Hotmail had many features since it’s start. Unlimited storage was one big feature. In 1997, Microsoft purchased Hotmail for $400 million, and changed the name to MSN Hotmail. They paired with the Microsoft Instant Messanger, then built items...

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dithwinxbox

Learn About Gaming History, Win an XBox One with IEEE!

Get this – our friends at IEEE are giving away an XBox One for checking out their history timeline! Of course, gaming consoles are a part of technology history, so this timeline is an awesome way to get a more in-depth view into gaming history! And you can win an XBox One. Here’s how your do it… From now until July 26th, simply head over to IEEE via this link, review the timeline and take the survey. Make sure you give them your email to be entered into the contest. Go back and learn even more about gaming history. Tweet or...

Trillian 0

July 1, 2000: Trillian, IM2 Released

2000 – Remember the days of the Instant Messenger? Yahoo IM or Microsoft Messenger, ICQ, AIM and many more. In 2000, a company called Trillian tried to capitalize on the market by making a IM client that could connect to all of these instant messengers. Only problem is that Yahoo! and Microsoft didn’t want to allow this to happen. They tried to block the software. However, new patches were installed and Trillian was able to access the messengers again. Trillian (www.trillian.im) is still in existance to this day. You can download for your Mac, PC, Android, iPhone, Blackberry, and more! Funny thing,...

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Motorola Cell Phone 0

June 26, 1997: Wireless Applications Protocol (WAP)

1997 – Ericsson, Motorola, Nokia and Unwired Planet create a partnership to start and build on the Wireless Applications Protocol (WAP) as a non-profit organization. The industry group was formed to keep wireless devices on track, bring Internet connected devices to all who need it, create a wireless protocol that works on all network technologies, make scalable applications and content, and work with existing standards to expand as wireless needs grow. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 26 Microsoft retires support for MS-DOS The First Barcode was scanned IBM Blue Gene/P Apple Mac G4 Computers were released

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Microsoft Logo 0

June 25, 1981: Microsoft Incorporates, Plans to Buy 86-DOS

1981 – Microsoft goes through a restructure to incorporate in Washington. Bill Gates would become president, Paul Allen was Executive Vice President. Steve Ballmer would come on full-time with a $50,000 year salary. The reason why they incorporated? On this same day, Paul Allen sends a proposal to Rod Black of Seattle Computer Products for Microsoft to purchase all rights to 86-DOS for $30,000.  At that point, they had only a non-exclusive license (since September 22, 1980). This was a strategic move because Microsoft had a relationship with IBM, and wanted to re-license for the IBM PC. After a month of negotiations, Seattle...

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Kodachrome Film 0

June 22, 2009: The End of Kodachrome Color Film

2009 – Kodak announced they would ended the production of Kodachrome color film. Once the leftover film is distributed, there will be no more made. That lasted until December, 2010. Kodak created their iconic Kodachrome film in 1935. This is a non-substansive, color reversal film was used in still photos and cinematography. It used the subtractive color method – which required a complex chemical system to make the negative. Kodachrome was invented by John Capstaff, who worked for a competitor until Eastman bought the company out. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 22 Dean Fox leaves Atari IBM and...

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Manchester Small-Scale Experimental Machine (SSEM) 0

June 21, 1948: Manchester Small-Scale Experimental Machine Runs First Program

1948 – What was first expected to be a practical use computer, the SSEM, or Small-Scale Experimental Machine became the first stored-program computer. Basically, it stores program instructions into it’s electronic memory. This 32-bit word length, cathode-ray tube computer was designed to only run subtraction and negation through hardware. Other functions could be run, but only through software. The first program was run on this day. It was written by Professor Tom Kilbum. The seventeen-instruction stored-program took 52 minutes to run. The program was tasked to find the highest proper factor of 218 (262,144). Full Day in Tech History podcast show...

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