Tagged: Microsoft

Nikola Tesla 0

January 7, 1943: Nikola Tesla Passed Away

 

 Born in 1856, Nikola Tesla was the inventor of alternating current. Tesla even worked for Edison from 1882 to 1886. He then started the Tesla Electric Light & Manufacturing company in where he worked more on AC electricity. This started the “War of Currents”, which we talked about on January 3rd when Edison electrocuted Topsy, the Elephant. Tesla was also known for many patents and inventions, including the Tesla coil, Electro-magnetic motor, incandescent electric light, electric railway system and many more. He was known for X-Rays, radio, the remote control and wireless communications. Learn more about Nikola through Tesla: Inventor of...

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Euphonium 0

December 22, 1845: the First Euphonium

 

 1845 – Today, we’re travelling to the Geek side of things. It’s not everyday that I get to talk about my other passion – Music. The Euphonium – often mistaken for a Tuba – was created. It was also coined in later years as “P.T. Barnums’ Euphonium. The word itself comes from the Greek word Euphonos – or Sweet voiced. The Euphonium is pitched in concert  B♭. Although a 3 valve instrument, professional Euphoniums have a 4th valve for compensation. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 22 Microsoft releases Excel 5.0 Security- Enhanced Linux (SELinux) is released Electronic...

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Altair 0

December 19, 1974: Do it Yourself Altair Kit

 

 1974 – Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (MITS) puts out the first ever “Do it yourself” Altair 8800. You would get it through Popular Mechanics Magazine, then assemble it yourself. This is a turning point in home computer setup. The price for an Altair 8800 kit – $397 – and it included Microsoft Altair BASIC. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 19 DirectX 9 is released RIAA switches from suing users to ISP Samuel Clemens patents suspenders Podcast: Play in new window | Download Subscribe! iTunes | RSS | More Subscribe Options

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W3C 0

December 14, 1994: W3C Held First Meeting

 

 1994 – The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C) held its first meeting at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Albert Vezza and Tim Berners-Lee founded the group to development and maintain international standards for the World Wide Web. Since then, the W3C has overseen the validation efforts in HTML and other formats. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 14 Delta rolls out WiFi on flights Microsoft releases Windows NT 4.0 SP2 Edward R. Murrow features the Whirlwind computer on See It Now Podcast: Play in new window | Download Subscribe! iTunes | RSS | More Subscribe...

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Jon Lech Johansen 0

December 9, 2002: Jon Lech Johansen (DVD Jon) Trial

 

 2002 – The trial of Jon Lech Johansen, better known as “DVD Jon,” begins with Johansen pleading not guilty. DVD Jon has been a pioneer in “Reverse engineering”. O.K, so that is a fancy way of saying “Pirating”, but without his efforts, advances might not have been made. He was acquitted on January 7, 2003. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 9 Yahoo acquires del.icio.us (delicious.com) Microsoft launches Windows 2.01 and Oxite Bandai releases WonderSwan Podcast: Play in new window | Download Subscribe! iTunes | RSS | More Subscribe Options

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Microsoft Crew 0

December 7, 1978: Microsoft Staff Picture

 

 1978 – It is one of the most infamous pictures in tech today. This is the Microsoft crew. Can you guess which one is Bill Gates? The picture was updated in 2008 when the group (except Bob Wallace, who passed away in 2002) got back together for Bill Gates last few days at Microsoft (below). The staff picture includes: Bill Gates, Andrea Lewis, Marla Wood, Paul Allen (2nd row) Bob O’Rear, Bob Greenberg (who helped launch Cabbage Patch Kids), Marc McDonald, Gordon Letwin, (3rd row) Steve Wood, Bob Wallace (passed away in 2002) and Jim Lane. This Day in Tech...

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IBM 7090 Mainframe 0

November 30, 1959: $2.9 Million IBM 7090 Mainframe

 

 1959 – Want to see a 2.9 million dollar computer? That was the IBM 7090 – a transistorized mainframe computer that was designed for scientific research and tech applications. It replaced the 709 series, which used vacuum tubes. The first two were delivered – one of the 7090’s would be used for the Mercury and Gemini space missions. Check out more on the IBM 7090 This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 30 The First Coaxial cable is installed Microsoft Vista is released to Volume licence customers Jeopardy contestant Ken Jennings loses. Podcast: Play in new window |...

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Pong 0

November 29, 1972: First Pong Machine

 

 1972 – Andy Cappa’s tavern in CA was the site for the first Pong game was wheeled into the establishment. The coin-operated game was put in by Atari co-founder Nolan Bushnell and game designer Al Alcorn. The duo decided that making their own game – rather than having 3rd parties do it – would help keep costs down. They then turned an old Roller rink and converted to a production line. Pong was the first successful video game system. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for November 25 Microsoft is first mentioned in a letter from Bill Gates to Paul Allen...

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