Tagged: Microsoft

Switchback Railway 0

January 20, 1885: the Gravity Pleasure Switchback Railway Patent

1885 – Sounding like anything but a roller coaster, the Gravity Pleasure Switchback Railway was the first American designed amusement coaster designed by LaMarcus Adna Thompson. Only 5 cents to ride, the Switchback was a simple coaster that took you about 600 feet to the next tower at six miles per hour. It had a height of 50 feet and a drop of 43 feet. It opened on June 16, 1884 and eventually was replaced. But on this day, the roller coaster saw one of its first patents from this ride. Learn more about Patents: Ingenious Inventions, How they work and How they...

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Franklin Ace 1200 0

January 18, 1983: Franklin Ace 1200

1983 – During the CP/M Show, Franklin Electronic Publichers revealed the Franklin Ace 1200 computer. The main feature of this computer (like the other Franklin computers before) was the fact they copied Apple’s ROM and operating system code. The Ace 1200 came with a Zilog Z80 processor a 1 MHz, 48K RAM, 16K ROM,2 – 5.25 Floppy disks and four expansion slots. The computer was announced here but didn’t come out until 1984. It cost the consumer $2,200 At that same show, Radio Shack introduced the TRS-80 Model 12 for $3,200 Wikazine – Full show notes for January 18 Stac Electronics sues...

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Steve Ballmer 0

January 13, 2000: Steve Ballmer Takes the Reins

2000 – Microsoft CEO Bill Gates announces he will be stepping down from his role but remain on the Board and embrace a new role as Chief software architect. Steve Ballmer will take over the CEO role and also remain president. Love him or hate him, Ballmer kept Microsoft running and helped raise annual revenues. Ballmer would remain CEO of Microsoft until February 2014, then take over as the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers. Bill Gates continued on the board. In 2014 he stepped down to Technology Advisor. Gates is also co-founder of the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation Wikazine –...

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TI-83 Graphing Calculator 0

January 10, 1996: TI-83 Graphing Calculator

1996 – Texas Instruments announced it would release the TI-83 and became one of the most popular calculators. The TI-83 had many graphing modes including polar, parametric, sequence and function graphs. It could also run statistics, trigonometry and algebraic functions. The TI-83 was replaced by the 83 Plus in 1999 which added flashable memory for upgrades. This calculator is still available today and you can get the Texas Instruments TI-83 Plus Graphing Calculator on Amazon. The TI-83 had a Zilog Z80 processor at 6 MHz and 32 kb of RAM. You could use 4 AAA batteries or the power supply to run. Price...

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Nikola Tesla 0

January 7, 1943: Nikola Tesla Passed Away

Born in 1856, Nikola Tesla was the inventor of alternating current. Tesla even worked for Edison from 1882 to 1886. He then started the Tesla Electric Light & Manufacturing company in where he worked more on AC electricity. This started the “War of Currents”, which we talked about on January 3rd when Edison electrocuted Topsy, the Elephant. Tesla was also known for many patents and inventions, including the Tesla coil, Electro-magnetic motor, incandescent electric light, electric railway system and many more. He was known for X-Rays, radio, the remote control and wireless communications. Learn more about Nikola through Tesla: Inventor of...

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Euphonium 0

December 22, 1845: the First Euphonium

1845 – Today, we’re travelling to the Geek side of things. It’s not everyday that I get to talk about my other passion – Music. The Euphonium – often mistaken for a Tuba – was created. It was also coined in later years as “P.T. Barnums’ Euphonium. The word itself comes from the Greek word Euphonos – or Sweet voiced. The Euphonium is pitched in concert  B♭. Although a 3 valve instrument, professional Euphoniums have a 4th valve for compensation. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 22 Microsoft releases Excel 5.0 Security- Enhanced Linux (SELinux) is released Electronic...

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Altair 0

December 19, 1974: Do it Yourself Altair Kit

1974 – Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (MITS) puts out the first ever “Do it yourself” Altair 8800. You would get it through Popular Mechanics Magazine, then assemble it yourself. This is a turning point in home computer setup. The price for an Altair 8800 kit – $397 – and it included Microsoft Altair BASIC. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 19 DirectX 9 is released RIAA switches from suing users to ISP Samuel Clemens patents suspenders

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W3C 0

December 14, 1994: W3C Held First Meeting

1994 – The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C) held its first meeting at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Albert Vezza and Tim Berners-Lee founded the group to development and maintain international standards for the World Wide Web. Since then, the W3C has overseen the validation efforts in HTML and other formats. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 14 Delta rolls out WiFi on flights Microsoft releases Windows NT 4.0 SP2 Edward R. Murrow features the Whirlwind computer on See It Now

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