Microsoft Archive

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January 18, 1990: Chicago Raid of PHRACK, Knight Lightning

Craig Neidorf

Craig Neidorf

1990 – The Chicago Task raids the home of Craig Neidorf – A.K.A. Knight Lightning. The group, along with Bellsouth, are looking for information on an article published in the hacker rag “PHRACK – Control Office Administration of Enhanced 911 Service”. The article was written by “the Eavesdropper” and contained information that was obtained by documents stolen from Bellsouth.

The group doesn’t have a warrant, but when they show up the next day with one, Neidorf’s hard drive comes up missing. Craig will then be arrested for tampering.

Wikazine – Full show notes for January 18

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January 13,1984: Jack Tramiel resigns from Commodore

Jack Tramiel

Jack Tramiel

1984 - Two days after the announcement of the 264 and 364 computers, CEO Jack Tramiel resigned from Commodore. There was a lot of battling within the board of directors. 6 months after Tramiel left, he started another company called “Trammel” and hired away a few of the key Commodore employees. The company was one of those that bought – then sold – Atari.

Wikazine – Full show notes for January 13

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January 10, 2000: The (AOL) Time Warner Acquisition

AOL - Time Warner

AOL – Time Warner

This is an interesting parallelism:1990 – Time Inc. acquires Warner Communications for $14.1 Billion.

2000 – AOL purchases Time Warner for $165 Billion in stock. The merger would finally complete on Jan 11 2001 when the Federal Trade Commission approves the merger.

AOL and Time Warner continue a relationship until 2009 when the two companies finally split.

Wikazine – Full show notes for January 10

[dithg2mpc]

  • Apple releases the Macintosh Plus
  • Microsoft settles with Caldera
  • A court rules against Rambus due to their “Spoliation” of documents
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January 7, 1982: Commodore 64 Introduced

Commodore 64

Commodore 64

1982 - the Commodore 64 was introduced by Commodore international. If featured a 6510 processor, 64KB RAM, 20 KB ROM, Microsoft BASIC and was yours for $600. Add the Ulimax, with 2KB for another $149.

Wikazine – Full show notes for January 7

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December 22, 1845: the Euphonium

Euphonium1845 – Today, we’re travelling to the Geek side of things. It’s not everyday that I get to talk about my other passion – Music. The Euphonium – often mistaken for a Tuba – was created. It was also coined in later years as “P.T. Barnums’ Euphonium. The word itself comes from the Greek word Euphonos – or Sweet voiced.

The Euphonium is pitched in concert  B♭. Although a 3 valve instrument, professional Euphoniums have a 4th valve for compensation.

This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 22

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December 19, 1974: First “Do it Yourself” Altair Kit

Altair

Altair

1974 - Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (MITS) puts out the first ever “Do it yourself” Altair 8800. You would get it through Popular Mechanics Magazine, then assemble it yourself. This is a turning point in home computer setup. The price for an Altair 8800 kit – $397 – and it included Microsoft Altair BASIC.

This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 19

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December 14, 1994: W3C First Meeting

W3C

W3C

1994 – The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C) held its first meeting at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Albert Vezza and Tim Berners-Lee founded the group to development and maintain international standards for the World Wide Web. Since then, the W3C has overseen the validation efforts in HTML and other formats.

This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 14

  • Delta rolls out WiFi on flights
  • Microsoft releases Windows NT 4.0 SP2
  • Edward R. Murrow features the Whirlwind computer on See It Now
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December 9, 2002: Jon Lech Johansen (DVD Jon) Pleads Not Guilty

Jon Lech Johansen

Jon Lech Johansen

2002 - The trial of Jon Lech Johansen, better known as “DVD Jon,” begins with Johansen pleading not guilty. DVD Jon has been a pioneer in “Reverse engineering”. O.K, so that is a fancy way of saying “Pirating”, but without his efforts, advances might not have been made. He was acquitted on January 7, 2003.

This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 9

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