Tagged: mozy

Dr. Alan Chow 0

June 30, 2000: Silicon Microchips beneath Human Retinas

2000 – Dr. Alan chow and brother Vincent announced they successfully placed a silicon microchip beneath human retinas. The chip is smaller than the head on a pin and only microns thin. These chips also contain solar cells to help power the chip. In what is called “Optobionics”, the ASR chip is inserted behind the retina in the “subretinal space”. This is a 2 hour procedure and the chip can last up to 8 years after (depending on care). Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 30 IBM unbundles software from Hardware President Bill Clinton e-signs the first bill...

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DNS 0

June 23, 1983: First successful test of the Domain Name System (DNS)

1983 – Paul Mockapetris and Jon Postel run the first successful test of the distributed Domain Name System (DNS). This automated process was to take over failing Arpanet and CSnet protocols because those relied on address books. DNS uses a hierarchical distributed naming system for the Internet or any private network. It associates the domain names with numerical IP addresses. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 23 Nintendo 64 is launched The Typewriter is patented

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Manchester Small-Scale Experimental Machine (SSEM) 0

June 21, 1948: Manchester Small-Scale Experimental Machine Runs First Program

1948 – What was first expected to be a practical use computer, the SSEM, or Small-Scale Experimental Machine became the first stored-program computer. Basically, it stores program instructions into it’s electronic memory. This 32-bit word length, cathode-ray tube computer was designed to only run subtraction and negation through hardware. Other functions could be run, but only through software. The first program was run on this day. It was written by Professor Tom Kilbum. The seventeen-instruction stored-program took 52 minutes to run. The program was tasked to find the highest proper factor of 218 (262,144). Full Day in Tech History podcast show...

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Steve Ballmer 0

June 11, 1980: Steve Ballmer Joins Microsoft

1980 – Otherwise known as “The 24th Man” (to join Microsoft, that is), Steve Ballmer came on as Microsoft’s first Business Manager. He made only $50k and stock options. Of course 30 years later, Steve succeeded Bill Gates as CEO of the Redmond based software company. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 11 Speak and Spell debuts Compaq purchases DEC for $9 million The first cameraphone photo – Philippe Kahn taking a picture of his newborn daughter Apple releases Safari for Windows 1st generation iPhone gets put on the Obsolete list

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Intel ATOM Processor 0

April 7, 2008: Intel ATOM Processor Launched

2008– Intel launches their newest processor: the ATOM processor. It’s codename was Silverthorne. It is a ATOM Z single processor using the 45 nm die processes (the processor was smaller than a penny). The ATOM processor would run at 800 MHZ with a 512 L2 cache and 533 Front side bus. The most current ATOM processor is the S1220, S1240 and S1260 for servers (released December 2012). ATOM processors can run 32 bit and 64 bit hardware and software. Wikazine – Full show notes for April 7 [dithy] Sun lays off Scalable System Group Workforce AOL VoIP launches Publication of the...

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SATAN 0

April 5, 1995: Security Administration Tool (SATAN) Released

1995– The program is called the Security Administrator Tool for Analyzing Networks. But you may call it SATAN. The Perl written program – Written by Dan Famer and Wietse Venema –  was released to help network admins find vulnerabilities in their remote systems. There was a lot of controversy over the tool and it’s release, since it was the first user friendly tool.SATAN was never updated since, and has been replaced with: Nessus and SAINT. Wikazine – Full show notes for April 5 AOL unveils Netscape Navagator v. 6 Honeywell MicroSystem 6/10 Apple releases Boot Camp for dual booting Mac Book: Protecting Networks with SATAN

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Motorola Cell Phone 0

April 3, 1973: First Cell Phone Call

1973 – Martin Cooper made the first handheld cellular phone call in public. Walking down the streets of New York, Cooper – the General Manager of Motorola’s communication system division – talked on the phone. It’s not the first cellular call since car phones have been around before then. The phone is also known as the “Brick” cell phone. Wikazine – Full show notes for April 3 Atari declares today Pac Man Day The first Telnet specification IBM introduces the PC Convertable

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Three Mile Island Meltdown 0

March 28, 1979: Meltdown of Three Mile Island

1979 – At 4 PM EST, the nuclear reactors in Middletown, PA (Dauphin County) experienced a partial meltdown. The incident was officially rated a 5-of-7 on the International Nuclear Event Scale: Accident with wider consequences. A stuck open pilot relief valve was to blame for the incident in the primary system. The valve allowed for nuclear reactor coolant to escape into the atmosphere. During the event, the EPA was dispached where they took daily samples of the air to make sure the levels were not harmful to the community. The evacuation of Middletown was ordered 28 hours later – mostly women...

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