Tagged: Personal computer

Atari-1200XL 1

December 13, 1982: Atari 1200XL

1982 – After a decent success of the Atari 400/800 line the company noticed the console was looking a little “old”. After all, the Atari 400 actually discolors upon UV light. The 400’s non-tactile keyboard was replaced with the 800’s raised key keyboard. Still, Atari felt they needed to bring this personal computer into the 80’s.Therefore, the 1200XL was born. It was a hybrid computer – using what they called “Sweet 16″ – a byte language developed by Steve Wozniak.  It was to manipulate 16-bit pointer data from an 8-bit system. The Atari 1200XL also featured 64 KB of RAM...

Play
Lenovo 0

December 8, 2004: IBM sells PC Division to Lenovo

2004 – It was an interesting day in the Tech community when we heard the news. IBM was getting out of the desktop and laptop markets and focus on server and infrastructure. They started by selling all their assets to Lenovo – China’s largest computer manufacturer. Lenovo wasn’t a household name in the US, but this pretty much changed that overnight.The deal was for $650 million in cash and $600 million in stock. Lenovo would also acquire $500 million in IBM liabilities, which would put the total to $1.75 billion. In return, Lenovo would instantly become the 3rd largest PC...

Play
Intel 80386DX 1

October 17, 1985: Intel 80386DX Processor

1985- Intel released the 80386 DX processor. The 275,000 transistor chip was a big jump from the 20 MHz 286. It contained the ability to address up to 4 GB of memory and had a bigger instruction set.  The chip would be released, but most people wouldn’t see the processor until Spring of 1986Interesting enough – the 386 chip was finally discontinued in the Fall of 2007. The chip was used after personal computer days to power many embedded systems. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 17 Texas Instruments “afternoon with TI management” IMDB is formed (sort...

Play
iWoz 0

September 25, 2006: iWoz (From Computer Geek to Cult Icon) Book

2006 – The book iWoz: from Computer Geek to Cult Icon: How I Invented the Personal Computer, Co-founded Apple and had Fun Doing it. (**WHEW!**) came out. It was a book that was written to dispel some of the rumors and misconceptions on many different items. iWoz: Computer Geek to Cult Icon at Amazon.com This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for September 25 Red Hat Linux 7.0 Released Ultima Online, the first MMORPG OS/2 Warp 4 Podcast: Play in new window | Download

Play
Bill Gates 0

May 26, 1995: Bill Gates Memo Said Microsoft Back on Track with Internet

1995 – Bill Gates sends out a memo to his staff saying that Microsoft needs to “Get back on track” to the Internet. The memo was entitled “The Internet Tidal wave.”  Gates emphasizes that this is as important as IBM was to the personal computer. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 25 AMD released the K6-2 processor Samsung announces the 256 SSD Psystar files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Podcast: Play in new window | Download

Play
Apple III 0

May 19, 1980: Apple III (aka “Apple Failure III”)

1980 – The machine was code named “Sara”. It was the Apple III and was planned to be the successor to the Apple II. However, the machine had enough failures that Apple had to re-launch this computer in August. Therefore, it was refered to as “Apple Failure III”. Then IBM came out with the PC and Apple switched gears with their Macintosh line. Apple III saw modest numbers before it was retired on April 24th, 1984. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 19 Star Wars Episode I Apple opens the first Apple Stores Intel debuts the pineview...

Play
Google Chromebook 0

May 11, 2011: Chromebook Introduced, 1979 Visicalc Demonstrated

2011 – Eric Schmidt shows off the new Google Chrome OS but with an added feature as he introduced Google Chromebook – a personal computer with the Google Chrome OS built-in. The device loads straight to the browser where you can install applications for functionality on your Chromebook. The first Chromebook would begin selling on June 15, 2011. 1979 – Daniel Bricklin and Robert Frankston demonstrate the spreadsheet program “Visicalc”. Of course, it will become the “killer app” for PC’s. 100 cells could be calculated in 20 seconds. By the first year, sales will hit on hundred thousand and seven...

Play