Tagged: Personal computer

Compaq Deskpro 4000N - the first NetPC 0

June 16, 1997: NetPC Announced

1997 – Several computer companies banded together to help create the NetPC. A disk-less computer that got all information, including install – from a corporate server or the Internet. Basically, these would be similar to thin clients or “Dumb terminals” for work computers. No CD drive, no floppy disc and limited disk space. Cases were sealed so nobody could get inside to reconfigure the computer. Installs would be handled via the Internet, therefore, no personal software could be installed. Microsoft and Intel unveiled the system at the PC Expo trade show. NetPC would work with Compaq, Dell, IBM, HP, Acer, Gateway 2000, Mitac,...

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AMD K6-2 0

May 26, 1998: AMD K6-2 Processor

1998 –  At the beginnings of the AMD / Intel battle, AMD brought out a processor to dual with Pentium II. The AMD K6-2 processor was a Super Socket 7 pin structure, which also was compatible with older Socket 7 motherboards. With 9.3 million transistors, the K6-2 had a CPU clock rate of 266 to 550 MHz. Of course, these were single-core processors and had front side bus of either 66 or 100 MHz. The K6-2 also featured the MMX and 3DNow! instruction set. The K6-2+ was added to keep up with Pentium III processors. The processor line only lasted...

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Star Wars I: the Phantom Menace 0

May 19, 1999: Star Wars Episode I

1999 – Sixteen years after “Return of the Jedi”, George Lucas finally moves his vision forward with “Star Wars: Episode I – the Phantom Menace”. The story of young Anakin Skywalker and how Obi-Wan Kenobi brought him in, trained him, and ultimately lost him to the dark side. Episode I grossed over $924.3 million worldwide and became one of the highest-grossing films of 1999. The 2nd set trilogy would continue with Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith. The movie was received with warm reviews. The general consensus was the character development lacked while the scenes, characters, and landscapes were breathtaking....

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Google Chromebook 0

May 11, 2011: Chromebook Introduced

2011 – Eric Schmidt shows off the new Google Chrome OS but with an added feature as he introduced Google Chromebook – a personal computer with the Google Chrome OS built-in. The device loads straight to the browser where you can install applications for functionality on your Chromebook. The first Chromebook would begin selling on June 15, 2011. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 11 Other Events in the Day in Technology History Sega begins shipping the Saturn system AOL launches free webmail Verizon sells part of Alltel to AT&T

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Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird 0

May 2, 1965: First Transatlantic Television Signal from “Early Bird” Intelsat I

1965 – Intelsat I, a.k.a. Early Bird, went into service. This geosynchronous satellite sent the first signal between nine different countries. A “One Hour TV Spectacular” was broadcast to Europe from the US, Canada, and Mexico. Intelsat I went up in space on April 6, 1965 and had only 240 voice circuits, so it could only transmit one TV channel at a time. Early Bird was one of three satellites that broadcast the first landing on the moon in 1969. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for May 2 Other Events in the Day in Technology History Excel launches for Macintosh...

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Apple IIc 0

April 24, 1984: Apple IIc Introduced

1984 – Apple introduces the Apple IIc, their answer to a portable machine. It weighed 7 1/2 lbs and featured a 1.023MHz CPU and 128 KB RAM. $1,295. The device device had a built-in floppy and peripheral expansion ports. This was a closed system – no expansion slots to plug in cards. It was deemed an appliance computer, which meant was ready to go when you pulled it out of the box. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 24 Other Events in the Day in Technology History IBM PC first announced (but wouldn’t be released until Aug...

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Microsoft Logo 0

April 21, 1977: MITS vs Bill Gates & Microsoft: 8080 BASIC

1977 – Two days prior, Microsoft send MITS a letter with the allegation that they were not up on royalty payments and if they didn’t catch up, MITS would be in breach and the 8080 BASIC would be pulled. MITS sends a letter stating that they are not correct. Ultimately, this would begin a debate that would end in November when Microsoft pulled the 8080 BASIC out. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 21 The Tanday 5000MC Intel 3 GHz Pentium 4 Firefox 3.0.9 is released

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Instagram Facebook 0

April 9, 2012: Facebook Purchased Instagram

2012 – Facebook – trying to get a hold on photosharing – decides to not wait for their iPhone app to come out but instead purchase Instagram for 1 billion dollars ($300 million and 23 million shares of Facebook stock). The reason Facebook made the purchase was for the close to 50 million Instagram users. Facebook had plans to keep both companies separate, but found later that joining the two via databases would help both companies grow.  The companies finalized the deal on September 6, 2012. Wikazine – Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for April 9 AMD “Barcelona”...

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