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Trillian 0

July 1, 2000: Trillian, IM2 Released

2000 – Remember the days of the Instant Messenger? Yahoo IM or Microsoft Messenger, ICQ, AIM and many more. In 2000, a company called Trillian tried to capitalize on the market by making a IM client that could connect to all of these instant messengers. Only problem is that Yahoo! and Microsoft didn’t want to allow this to happen. They tried to block the software. However, new patches were installed and Trillian was able to access the messengers again. Trillian (www.trillian.im) is still in existance to this day. You can download for your Mac, PC, Android, iPhone, Blackberry, and more! Funny thing,...

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Dr. Alan Chow 0

June 30, 2000: Silicon Microchips beneath Human Retinas

2000 – Dr. Alan chow and brother Vincent announced they successfully placed a silicon microchip beneath human retinas. The chip is smaller than the head on a pin and only microns thin. These chips also contain solar cells to help power the chip. In what is called “Optobionics”, the ASR chip is inserted behind the retina in the “subretinal space”. This is a 2 hour procedure and the chip can last up to 8 years after (depending on care). Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 30 IBM unbundles software from Hardware President Bill Clinton e-signs the first bill...

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ASCI White 0

June 29, 2000: The ASCI White

2000 – IBM unveiled the ASCI White – their fastest computer yet. This supercomputer was based on IBM’s commercial RS/6000 SP computer. 512 computers were connected to make this supercomputer. over 8 million processors, 5 Terabytes of memory and 160 TB of disk storage. The computer was completed on this day in New York, and would go on-line on August 15, 2001 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 29 Compuserve acquires TheSource, a major competitor Gigabit Ethernet standard is set Max Butler pleads guilty to stealing 2 million credit cards

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Motorola Cell Phone 0

June 26, 1997: Wireless Applications Protocol (WAP)

1997 – Ericsson, Motorola, Nokia and Unwired Planet create a partnership to start and build on the Wireless Applications Protocol (WAP) as a non-profit organization. The industry group was formed to keep wireless devices on track, bring Internet connected devices to all who need it, create a wireless protocol that works on all network technologies, make scalable applications and content, and work with existing standards to expand as wireless needs grow. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 26 Microsoft retires support for MS-DOS The First Barcode was scanned IBM Blue Gene/P Apple Mac G4 Computers were released

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Symbian 0

June 24, 2008: Nokia Acquires Symbian, Makes it Open Source

2008 – Nokia announced they have purchased Symbian outright. They originally owned 46% of the company, and bought out the remaining 54% for $410 million. But then the company turned around and created the Symbian Foundation – a group that would house and give away the software code. The group and software would remain functioning until 2010. Symbian Foundation then closed, citing that it would change to a legal entity, responsible for licencing software and intellectual property.  The transition completed in 2011. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 24 Symantec acquires Ghost software Florida Judge grants Apple permission...

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Kodachrome Film 0

June 22, 2009: The End of Kodachrome Color Film

2009 – Kodak announced they would ended the production of Kodachrome color film. Once the leftover film is distributed, there will be no more made. That lasted until December, 2010. Kodak created their iconic Kodachrome film in 1935. This is a non-substansive, color reversal film was used in still photos and cinematography. It used the subtractive color method – which required a complex chemical system to make the negative. Kodachrome was invented by John Capstaff, who worked for a competitor until Eastman bought the company out. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 22 Dean Fox leaves Atari IBM and...

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Manchester Small-Scale Experimental Machine (SSEM) 0

June 21, 1948: Manchester Small-Scale Experimental Machine Runs First Program

1948 – What was first expected to be a practical use computer, the SSEM, or Small-Scale Experimental Machine became the first stored-program computer. Basically, it stores program instructions into it’s electronic memory. This 32-bit word length, cathode-ray tube computer was designed to only run subtraction and negation through hardware. Other functions could be run, but only through software. The first program was run on this day. It was written by Professor Tom Kilbum. The seventeen-instruction stored-program took 52 minutes to run. The program was tasked to find the highest proper factor of 218 (262,144). Full Day in Tech History podcast show...

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