Tagged: stitcher

IBM RAMAC 0

October 29, 2013: William Lowe, Inventor of the IBM PC Passes

2013: If you grew up in the 80’s, you knew what an IBM PC was. Even in the 90’s and 00’s, the PC was what you had in the corner of the house to do homework on, surf the internet, work out expenses and more. William C. Lowe was the man that brought that all together. He joined IBM in 1962 and left in 1991. It was in 1981 that the IBM PC debuted. Did you know IBM was late in the PC game? In order for them to beef up a PC division, they almost bought Atari. Instead, they...

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Subliminal-Brain 0

October 26, 1998: First Computer Run by Using Thought

1998 – A Georgia man became the first person that ran a computer controlled by thought. The subject (known as J.R.) was paralyzed due to stroke. Dr Roy Bakay and Dr. Phillip Kennedy implanted a glass cone into J.R’s brain, which would allow him to mentally control the PC. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 26 Sig Hartmann resigns from Commodore Sony introduced the PS2 in the United States Facebook releases Scribe JVC announced U-format video recorders Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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Internet 0

October 24, 1995: Internet Coined by Federal Networking Council

1995 – The Federal Networking council officially coins the term Internet: the Council’s Committee on Computing, Information and Communications (CCIC) created the FNC on Sept. 20th, 1995 to act as a forum for networking collaborations among Federal agencies.From nitrd.gov Resolution: The Federal Networking Council (FNC) agrees that the following language reflects our definition of the term “Internet. “Internet refers to the global information system that – (i) is logically linked together by a globally unique address space based on the Internet Protocol (IP) or its subsequent extensions/follow-ons; (ii) is able to support communications using the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) suite or its...

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Intel 80386DX 1

October 17, 1985: Intel 80386DX Processor

1985- Intel released the 80386 DX processor. The 275,000 transistor chip was a big jump from the 20 MHz 286. It contained the ability to address up to 4 GB of memory and had a bigger instruction set.  The chip would be released, but most people wouldn’t see the processor until Spring of 1986Interesting enough – the 386 chip was finally discontinued in the Fall of 2007. The chip was used after personal computer days to power many embedded systems. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 17 Texas Instruments “afternoon with TI management” IMDB is formed (sort...

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token-ring-configuration 0

October 15, 1985: IBM Announces Token Ring Network

1985- IBM announced, with co-developer Texas Instruments, the Token Ring network along with PC Network software – six months ahead of schedule. The TR only did network transmission speed of 4 Mbps (It didn’t hit speeds of 16 Mbps until 1989), and worked over standard phone wiring. Using terminated BNC cable, Token Ring created just that; a Ring connection that talks in one direction. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 15 Mac Plus Retires, Mac Classic Launches John Sculley resigns from Apple AOL Lays off 20% Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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zmodem 0

October 14,1986: Open Source ZModem Released

1986 – Telenet funded a project to develop an improved public domain application to application file transfer protocol. This protocol would alleviate the throughput problems their network customers were experiencing with XMODEM and Kermit file transfers. ZMODEM could provide high performance and reliability over packet switched networks while preserving XMODEM’s simplicity. It made XModem and YModem obsolete. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for October 14 Chuck Yeager flies the speed of sound ARM 250 is released Apple launched the iPhone 4S Google announced Buzz was shutting down. Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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Hayes Microcomputer Files bankruptcy 0

October 9, 1998: Hayes Microcomputer Filed Chapter 11

1998 – We all remember the modem, right? Dial into the internet through an ISP? Some of you may still have that technology, but if you have dealt with modems for a while, you remember Hayes. The Hayes corporation was pretty big back in the day – giving your Apple II connectivity to the world. Well, that is until 1998 when it’s course ran out. Stocks went from $12 a share, down to almost nothing. Hayes had no choice but to file for bankruptcy. Zoom Technologies (now called (Zoom Telephonics) bought the company out in 1999. This Day in Tech...

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SEGA Saturn Launches 0

September 2, 1995: Sega Saturn Launched, 1969: ARPANET Connects

1995 – Sega launches the Saturn video game console in the US. The 32-bit Cartridge loading system contained the 2 x Hitachi SH-2 32-bit RISC (28.6 MHz). It was launched in Japan and Europe earlier in the year, but didn’t hit the US until this date. This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for September 2 You could get the system with Virtua Fighter for $399. Below is the teaser commercial for the game system. Other items in Day in Tech History: Ultima I released The first Interface Message Processor is connected to the ARPANET eBay stops an auction of a...

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