Tagged: stitcher

Spam 0

July 5, 1937: SPAM (The Luncheon Meat) is Introduced

Not the email version. In 1937, Hormel came out with the first can of SPAM. The Luncheon meat. Spam was derived from the words Spiced Ham. It is pre-cooked meat that contained chopped pork, ham mean, salt, water, potato starch, and sodium nitrate. So if you have high blood pressure, you might want to stay away from this stuff. Spam comes in many varieties, including Hot & Spicy, Less sodium (25%), Spam Lite, Oven Roasted Turkey, and others. SPAM is made in SpamTown, USA – or Austin, Minnesota. McDonalds uses Spam in Guam, hawaii and Saipan. Spam is known as...

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Hotmail 0

July 4, 1996: Microsoft Hotmail Independence Day Launch

“Happy Independence Day. In return, we are going to give you a great new way to get email. It’s called “Hotmail“. Be free from your internet service provider!” That was the call to action on 1996. Hotmail launched their email service as “HoTMaiL” (HTML is upper-case). It is the first web-based email that was later named MSN Hotmail, then Windows Live Hotmail. Hotmail had many features since it’s start. Unlimited storage was one big feature. In 1997, Microsoft purchased Hotmail for $400 million, and changed the name to MSN Hotmail. They paired with the Microsoft Instant Messanger, then built items...

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Trillian 0

July 1, 2000: Trillian, IM2 Released

2000 – Remember the days of the Instant Messenger? Yahoo IM or Microsoft Messenger, ICQ, AIM and many more. In 2000, a company called Trillian tried to capitalize on the market by making a IM client that could connect to all of these instant messengers. Only problem is that Yahoo! and Microsoft didn’t want to allow this to happen. They tried to block the software. However, new patches were installed and Trillian was able to access the messengers again. Trillian (www.trillian.im) is still in existance to this day. You can download for your Mac, PC, Android, iPhone, Blackberry, and more! Funny thing,...

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Dr. Alan Chow 0

June 30, 2000: Silicon Microchips beneath Human Retinas

2000 – Dr. Alan chow and brother Vincent announced they successfully placed a silicon microchip beneath human retinas. The chip is smaller than the head on a pin and only microns thin. These chips also contain solar cells to help power the chip. In what is called “Optobionics”, the ASR chip is inserted behind the retina in the “subretinal space”. This is a 2 hour procedure and the chip can last up to 8 years after (depending on care). Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 30 IBM unbundles software from Hardware President Bill Clinton e-signs the first bill...

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Aereo 0

June 28, 2014: Aereo Shuts Down

2014 – Trying to be the first provider of over-the-air channels, Aereo was told to shut down completely after a supreme court decision went against the company. The idea was simple – take the over-the-air network channels and offer them on the Internet. Based in New York, the company opened services in 24 different cities. You could only watch the programming of your area on your PC, Mac or Linux. There were around 28 channels you could choose from and pricing was simply $1 a day. Aereo was faced with many legal issues, including the Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition...

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Microsoft Logo 0

June 25, 1981: Microsoft Incorporates, Plans to Buy 86-DOS

1981 – Microsoft goes through a restructure to incorporate in Washington. Bill Gates would become president, Paul Allen was Executive Vice President. Steve Ballmer would come on full-time with a $50,000 year salary. The reason why they incorporated? On this same day, Paul Allen sends a proposal to Rod Black of Seattle Computer Products for Microsoft to purchase all rights to 86-DOS for $30,000.  At that point, they had only a non-exclusive license (since September 22, 1980). This was a strategic move because Microsoft had a relationship with IBM, and wanted to re-license for the IBM PC. After a month of negotiations, Seattle...

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Symbian 0

June 24, 2008: Nokia Acquires Symbian, Makes it Open Source

2008 – Nokia announced they have purchased Symbian outright. They originally owned 46% of the company, and bought out the remaining 54% for $410 million. But then the company turned around and created the Symbian Foundation – a group that would house and give away the software code. The group and software would remain functioning until 2010. Symbian Foundation then closed, citing that it would change to a legal entity, responsible for licencing software and intellectual property.  The transition completed in 2011. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 24 Symantec acquires Ghost software Florida Judge grants Apple permission...

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