United States Archive

0

March 30, 1951: UNIVAC I – First American Commercial Computer

Univac

March 30, 1951: Univac is Unveiled

1951John William Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert unveil the first commercial computer, the UNIVersal Automatic Computer (UNIVAC I). The computer was manufactured under the company name of Sperry Rand Corporation for the United States Census Bureau. The UNIVAC will remain in operation through 1963.Univac I was not only the first American commercial computer, but also the first computer designed to computer large numbers. The first contracts for these computers were government agencies, like the Census Bureau and US Air Force. It took almost a year to finally ship the first Univac computer.

Wikazine – Full show notes of Technology History for March 30

Friends of Day in Tech History



Time to upgrade your backup! Built for virtualization at: Veeam.com

Please add to your favorite aggregator. RSS Feed – iTunes – Stitcher –TechPodcasts – Google+ - Twitter@dayintechhist

Subscribe to Day in Tech History Show Notes!
  • Quantum sells to Maxtor
  • Intel launches Nehalem
  • Microsoft ends Encarta
Play
0

March 12, 1986: First CeBit Conference

Cebit

March 12, 1986: First Cebitconference is held

1986- It’s full name is Centrum der Büro- und Informationstechnik (Centre of Office and Information technology). CeBit actually was started in the 70′s with the Hanover fair. However, the two separated in 1986 when it was decided that together, the two were not doing too well. Since then, CeBit has grown to be a very important conference for all IT.CeBit expanded in 1999, and the sponsor brought the show to Asia, Australia, Turkey, and the US.  CeBit runs 5 days in Hanover, Germany.

Wikazine – Full show notes for March 12

Friends of Day in Tech History



Time to upgrade your backup! Built for virtualization at: Veeam.com

Please add to your favorite aggregator. RSS Feed – iTunes – Stitcher –TechPodcasts – Google+ - Twitter@dayintechhist

Subscribe to Day in Tech History Show Notes!
  • V-Chip technology becomes mandatory in televisions
  • AOL buys Bebo
  • 2007 - Hulu launches in the US
Play
0

February 23, 1896: Tootsie Roll Introduced

Tootsie Roll

February 23, 1896 – Tootsie Roll is introduced in US

1896 - A little Geeky knowledge for ya – The Tootsie roll is introduced. Austrian immigrant Leo Hishfield took the idea to a New York store and sold the idea. The name comes from her 5 year old daughter, whom everyone called “Tootsie”. It became the first “Penny candy” and was even a War time ration since it could withstand severe weather conditions.

Wikazine – Full show notes for February 22

  • Texas Instruments recalls the TI-99/4a for a short in the system
  • JTS Corp sells Atari to HIACXI, who is owned by Hasbro
  • Comcast OnDemand is launched
Play
0

January 6, 1980: GPS week zero

GPS

GPS

1980 – The first Global Positioning System (GPS) week zero starts. In the GPS system, dates are express as a number for the week of the year and one for the day of the week – For instance, we are in Cycle 1, Week 0541 and Day 02. GPS will recycle every 1,024 weeks (19.6 years).

Wikazine – Full show notes for January 6

Play
0

December 25, 1998: Y2K Compliance

Y2K

Y2K

1998 – during the last couple years of the 20th century, the race was on to fix an oversight in multiple computer systems. The problem was dubbed “Y2K” or the Millennium bug. Bottom line was that all computers worked on a 2 digit year system instead of 4. Because of this, once the clock rolled, computers would think it’s 1900 instead of 2000 and bigger issues would happen.For instance, if you were born in 1968, then you would be -68 years old in a computer calculating your birth date. If you had a bill due of $1,000 since 1998, then you might find yourself with a reverse interest, in turn causing financial institutions to go into turmoil.

In 1998, President Bill Clintion made a statement that the Social Security payment system was officially Y2K compliant.

By the way: Most people resolved the problem by not programming in a 4 digit year, but by shifting the thinking of the 2 digit year. Therefore, in 2012 (which some shifted to), they will have these issues all over again.

Play
0

December 12: Apple Files Initial Public Offering

Apple

1980 - Apple Computer goes up for their Initial Public Offering and makes a statement in the market. Using the symbol “AAPL“, Apple shares started at $22 – but sell out within minutes. By the end of the day, shares rose to $29. The market value became 1.8 Billion, which, in turn, made employees and investors pretty rich – Steve Jobs reports $217 Million, being the largest shareholder. It beat out Ford Motor when it went IPOV (IPO Viral).

This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 12

  • OSCAR I goes into orbit
  • Christopher Cockerell patents the Hovercraft
  • FidoNet #1 Hard drive failure
  • Gawker.com is hacked and full email, password information was up on the Pirate Bay
Play
0

December 11, 1967: Concorde Supersonic Airliner

Concorde Jet

Concorde Jet

1967 - The Concorde was a British and French venture. It wa the first supersonic airliner. The prototype (Concorde 001) was rolled out to 1100 present. British technology minister Anthony Wedgwood Benn coined it Concorde on that day. The last “e” would stand for excellence. The first flight would not happen until March 1969.

This Day in Tech History podcast show notes for December 11

Play