Tagged: United States

Hollywood 0

July 13, 2011: Netflix Splits DVD – Streaming

2011 – CEO Reed Hastings announced a bombshell that, in turn, brought on Netflix’s single worst year ever. He announced that they were splitting Netflix streaming from DVD rentals. With that, the price would be doubled – $8 for 2 DVD rental plan and $8 for streaming. If you were an existing customer, you would be grandfathered in until September. This news caused their stock to fall, which continued when Hastings announced the DVD division was to be rebranded as Qwikster, and sold (which, of course, didn’t happen). 1923 – HollywoodLand Sign is dedicated to the people in Los Angeles CA. The...

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Dan Kaminsky 0

July 8, 2007: The Big DNS Flaw, 1881 Ice Cream Sundae Created

In 2007, developer Dan Kaminsky found a flaw in the addressing of the Domain Name System, or DNS. DNS is found on home to commercial routers around the world. The issue was so severe, that they were not divulging the issue until a patch could be implemented on a wide scale. On March 31st, Kaminsky – along with 16 other developers – gathered at Microsoft to work on a massive patch and synchronize the release so all details could be released as well. The Patch was released in July 8th, 2008. For more information, see the Explaination of the DNS Flaw Full...

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Spam 0

July 5, 1937: SPAM is Introduced (The Luncheon Meat)

Not the email version. In 1937, Hormel came out with the first can of SPAM. The Luncheon meat. Spam was derived from the words Spiced Ham. It is pre-cooked meat that contained chopped pork, ham mean, salt, water, potato starch, and sodium nitrate. So if you have high blood pressure, you might want to stay away from this stuff. Spam comes in many varieties, including Hot & Spicy, Less sodium (25%), Spam Lite, Oven Roasted Turkey, and others. SPAM is made in SpamTown, USA – or Austin, Minnesota. McDonalds uses Spam in Guam, hawaii and Saipan. Spam is known as...

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Michael Jackson 0

June 25, 2009: Michael Jackson Passes, Social Media Goes Down

2009 – Pop star Michael Jackson is rushed to the hospital. He first was in a coma, but then it was reported he passed away. This brought several social network sites down from the flood of  reminiscence and questions. Google search had problems, too, as people would search on the pop star. Wikipedia was stressed due to continual edits to his Wiki page. A major change was made to MediaWiki after that incident to lock down certain pages when major events occur. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 25 Paul Allen places an offer of $30 thousand...

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Univac 0

June 14, 1951: UNIVAC I Unveiled

1951 – It was the first commercial general-use computer. The UNIVAC I was unveiled in Washington DC. It was developed for the US census bureau. It stood 8 foot high and used magnetic tape at 10,000 characters a second.UNIVAC is an acronym for the Universal Automatic Computer. The computer itself was delivered to the United States Census Bureau on March 31st, 1951. UNIVAC I was also used to predict the result of the 1952 Presidential election. UNIVAC I cost around 1.2 million to build, which was a lot larger than their estimated price of $159,000. 46 units were built and delivered. 5,200...

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Pittsburgh Supercomputer 0

June 9, 1986: Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

1986 – The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center opens. It links 5 supercomputer centers together – Princeton, San Diego, Illinois, and Cornell University. PSC is a leading partner in the TeraGrid, the National Science Foundation’s cyberinfrastructure program. Full Day in Tech History podcast show notes for June 9 Linux Kernel 2.0 is released iPhone 2.0 launches MessageMedia and Revnet join to become North America’s largest e-mail marketer Podcast: Play in new window | Download

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Hollerith Punch Card Reader 0

June 8, 1887: Herman Hollerith Gets Patent for Punch Card Reader

1887 – Herman Hollerith is a pioneer. His creations in the 19th century were detrimental in modern computing. Herman Hollerith’s creations helped the United States create a Census. On June 8th he received a patent for a punch card reader, which was used in many fashions, including school attendance, for almost 100 years. Hollerith’s Punch card system also has been at the point of controversy – IBM was sued using the Alien Tort Claims Act because Hollerith machines were used in the 1933 census. This ultimately gave Adolf Hitler a full list of Germans and Jews in Germany. It was so useful to...

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